Sector Route-Way
for adult social care

Set over five stages, the route-way is a form of support that can be offered to unemployed people to give them the skills and confidence to move into entry and other level jobs in the adult social care sector.

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About Sector Route-Way

Set over five stages, the route-way is a form of support that can be offered to unemployed people to give them the skills and confidence to move into entry and other level jobs in the adult social care sector.

Open/Close Stage
Overview of the Sector Route-way

About Sector Route-Way

Skills for Care has been working with partners to provide a national Sector Route-way for adult social care - a form of support that can be offered to unemployed people to give them the skills and confidence to move into entry and other level jobs in the adult social care sector.

A key part of the route-way is the Level 1 Award in Preparing to Work in Adult Social Care that gives learners a good idea of what it would be like to work in adult social care, and at the same time helps them to develop the skills they need to get started.

The route-way has now been established as the pre-employment support process for adult social care endorsed by the sector.

Overview of the Sector Route-way

The route-way is a form of support that can be offered to unemployed people to find sustained employment in social care.

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Identifying the Sector Route-Way

Though we call it the route-way throughout this guide it may be described in different ways according to how it’s being used - it could be a sector-based work academy organised by Jobcentre Plus, a Traineeship run by a local college, or a pre-employment programme run by a Work Programme provider using a name they choose.

Whatever it’s called, it should retain these key principles:

  • Be run via a three-way partnership.
  • Delivers the Level 1 Award in Preparing to Work in Adult Social Care.
  • Follows good practice as laid out in this guide.
Identifying the Sector Route-Way
Type of jobs are available

Types of jobs available

  • Social care is about providing personal and practical support to help people live their lives, supporting them to maintain their independence, dignity and control.
  • Social care covers a huge variety of services ranging from personal assistants, community support, providing ‘at home’ care or day services, through to residential or nursing care homes and respite care.
  • Jobs in the sector include care assistants, social workers, cleaners, cooks, gardeners, therapists, advocates, managers, trainers, drivers – the list goes on and is constantly changing.
Think Care Careers

Think Care Careers

View job opportunities and longer term career development opportunities available.

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Available jobs in adult social care

Available jobs in adult social care

The adult social care sector is one of the very few sectors able to offer sustainable job vacancies in the current economic climate.

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What needs to be done by employment support services in the preparation phase?

What needs to be done by employment support services in the preparation phase?

  • Three-way partnerships need to be established in any geographical area where the route-way will be made available. Sufficient lead-in time should be allowed so that partnership meetings can be held and so that each partner has time to prepare their own contribution prior to the first route-way courses taking place.
  • As co-ordinators of the route-way process, employment support services must make sure that practical arrangements for each stage of the route-way process are in place. This includes selection procedures, course schedules, work experience arrangements, transition support plans and processes for monitoring and review. View guidance on setting up work experience.
  • When selecting learning providers to deliver the route-way course, co-ordinators should ensure that course tutors have occupational competence in the field of adult social care. This means that they should have direct personal experience of working in the social care sector as well as up-to-date knowledge of the legislation, policy and issues affecting the Sector. I Care…Ambassadors are enthusiastic people already working in social care who can provide valuable input to the route-way course. To find out more go to I Care… Ambassador info & search.
  • Front line employment/careers advisers need to be made aware of the type of jobs that are available in the care sector, and the skills, values and attitudes that potential recruits would need in order to work in the sector. They may wish to print a copy of Skills for Care – supporting careers and employment advisers and keep it by their desk for handy reference.
Close Stage

Preparation phase: Setting the Sector Route-Way up locally

The route-way for adult social care will only work if it is delivered by an effective district or local partnership. Every unemployed customer that enters the route-way can expect to have contact with three different people during the process.

Setting the Sector Route-Way up locally

The three-way partnership

The route-way for adult social care will only work if it is delivered by an effective district or local partnership.

Every unemployed customer that enters the route-way can expect to have contact with three different people during the process. Providing named support throughout each stage is important.

Who’s involved with the three-way partnership
Employment support service

Employment support services have a central role in making sure the route-way is well planned, well promoted and well used. During the preparation phase they will be setting up local partnerships and making sure that all the practical arrangements are in place. This will include making sure that sufficient funding is available at a local level for the delivery of the route-way programme. Once the route-way courses are up and running, employment advisers will take the lead role in promoting the route-way and providing support to individual unemployed customers.

Care sector specialist

The role of the care sector specialist is to provide sector expertise to the potential recruit and to the other two partners. They could be drawn from various sources and arrangements will vary from one area to another, according to local resources. Sector specialists can help with recruitment by promoting the sector at recruitment events and by supporting employment advisers when they are checking the suitability of potential recruits. They will usually take a lead role in co-ordinating workplace visits/experience and can also help the skills development specialist by arranging guest speakers for the course and supporting in-course assessment.

Skills development assessment specialist

The role of the skills development and assessment specialist is likely to be filled by one of the route-way course tutors, although local arrangements may vary. The skills specialist will focus on the development needs of the unemployed customer, making sure that they have a Basic Skills assessment before starting the course and that they are able to manage and benefit from level 1 learning. As everyone working in adult social care will need to develop good communication skills, it is essential that they have a thorough literacy/numeracy/ESOL assessment before they begin. This partner will also be responsible for advising on any further training needs that the unemployed customer might have after the end of course assessment.

Guidance for Learning Providers

Getting the most out of your
work experience

This handbook is designed to help those on the Sector
Route-Way get the most out of your their work experience.

View

Level 1 Award

Offering work experience as part
of the Sector Route-Way

This guide is for adult social care employers thinking
about offering work experience. It will also be of interest to
employment/careers advisers who organise pre-employment
support programmes for the adult social care sector.

View

Open/Close Stage
Close Stage

Stage 1: Marketing and promoting the care sector and the Sector Route-Way

Marketing and promotion of the care sector as potential destination and of the route-way as possible entry point. Front line employment/careers advisers will be letting their customers know about the type of job opportunities available in the care sector.

Marketing and promoting the care sector and the care Sector Route-Way

What needs to be done by employment support services during stage 1?

During stage 1 of the route-way, front line employment/careers advisers will be letting their customers know about the type of job opportunities available in the care sector. They will also be promoting the route-way as one of the ways that unemployed customers could begin a social care career.

  • This promotion might take place at job fairs, recruitment events, pre-redundancy support sessions or one-to-one meetings between employment advisers and their customers.
  • Although the promotion will be coordinated by the employment support service, help from others in the three-way partnership should always be available. For example, I Care…Ambassadors could be invited to give talks at recruitment events so that potential recruits get a realistic and up-to-date view of what a career in social care might be like.
  • Employment advisers can also access a range of other useful resources outlined in the further information section.
Available jobs in adult social care

Promotional materials

See Skills for Care’s promotional materials on thinking about a career in social care.

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Think Care Careers

Think Care Careers

View job opportunities and longer term career development opportunities available.

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I Care... Ambassadors

I Care...Ambassadors

I Care...Ambassadors are people working in adult social care who are willing to share their experiences.

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Open/Close Stage
Close Stage

Stage 2: Recruitment and selection

Recruitment adviser assesses suitability for the route-way with support from skills and sector specialists. This stage is all about getting the decision right and making sure that only those suited to a career in social care join the route-way.

Process of recruitment and selection onto the Sector Route-Way

Process of recruitment and selection onto the Sector Route-Way

Stage 2 is all about getting the decision right and making sure that only those suited to a career in social care join the route-way.

  • Employment advisers already know how important it is to give their customers the right type of support. They also know how important it is to give employers the right type of job applicant. But it is critically important to those who rely on social care for support with their daily lives that only the best possible applicants are recruited into the sector.
  • Once people have begun a career in social care they will receive regular ongoing training to develop the skills and knowledge they need for their particular type of work. This means that people do not need social care experience or qualifications to start a social care career.
  • They do however need to have the right values and attitudes. Further guidance on this is given within the suitability checklist, but employment advisers should also call on the help of their care sector partner when making decisions about recruitment onto the route-way programme.
  • The recruits also need to have good communication skills and be able to cope with and benefit from the level 1 learning that takes place on the 60 hour route-way course. Employment advisers should refer their customers to a specialist assessor for a full Basic Skills assessment before confirming their entry on to the route-way programme.
  • One other important point to raise with customers at this stage is the policy relating to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks. Everyone who applies for a job in social care has to have a criminal record check before they can start work. Employment advisers should make sure that their customers know about this in case they are unwilling to have the check done, or have a criminal record that could prevent them from being allowed to work in the sector. (Please note that DBS checks will not normally be made during the route-way process as it is the responsibility of employers to make these checks when appointing social care posts.)
  • Some customers who are assessed as being suited to a career in social care may be eligible to follow other routes into the sector instead of or as well as the 60-hour route-way course. Employment advisers should decide on the most appropriate form of support at this point.
Sustainability checker

Suitability checklist

A tool for employment advisers to ensure that the route-way is the right choice for their customer.

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Customer questionnaire

Customer questionnaire

A self-assessment checklist to help customers decide if the care sector is the right choice for them.

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Open/Close Stage
Close Stage

Stage 3: Pre-employment learning and development course

The Level 1 Award in Preparing to Work in adult social care is achieved by all those who successfully complete the pre-employment course. The course is designed to give unemployed learners a quick but comprehensive introduction to working in the sector.

Pre-employment learning and development course

The Level 1 Award in Preparing to Work in Adult Social Care is achieved by all those who successfully complete the pre-employment course.

The course is designed to give unemployed learners a quick but comprehensive introduction to working in the sector so they can decide if a social care career is right for them.

Pre-employment learning and development course

What happens during the pre-employment course?

The course involves around 60 hours of ‘classroom’ learning as well as work-place visits or work experience.

Throughout the course, learners will develop their communication and employability skills and will learn about the values and principles that are central to all types of work in the social care sector. They will also learn about the different types of job opportunities and career development options that are available, hopefully getting a real feel for the social care sector by the time they complete the course. For more information on the level 1 award and the learning outcomes click here.

The course will be delivered in modules over a number of weeks. It can be delivered in a variety of ways but will typically be taught over a period of three to six weeks. Guidance on the delivery of the pre-employment learning and development is available.

Learning will be assessed throughout the course and on completion, the course tutor and the workplace visit/experience provider will advise on any further training needs that the learner might have and help to identify next steps. At this stage, the options for the learner include:

  • Moving straight into employment (with or without a work trial).
  • Being enrolled onto a care job waiting list or matching system where they can be referred to employers when suitable vacancies arise. Once enrolled, employment support services should ensure they continue to receive job-search and skills development support so that the benefits of completing the route-way course don’t fade.
  • For anyone assessed as being unsuited to a career in social care, referral to another form of employment related support.

What needs to be done by employment support services during stage 3?

During the preparation phase, employment support providers will have already ensured that all arrangements are in place for the delivery of the route-way course and workplace visits/experience. This means that employment advisers don’t need to take any action during this stage other than sorting out any unforeseen problems that may arise.

However, at the end of stage 3 they must liaise with the course tutor and any workplace visit/experience provider before resuming responsibility for helping learners with the next steps towards employment.

Guidance for Learning Providers

Getting the most out of your
work experience

This handbook is designed to help those on the Sector
Route-Way get the most out of your their work experience.

View

Level 1 Award

Offering work experience as part
of the Sector Route-Way

This guide is for adult social care employers thinking
about offering work experience. It will also be of interest to
employment/careers advisers who organise pre-employment
support programmes for the adult social care sector.

View

Open/Close Stage
Close Stage

Stage 4: Transition into employment

Those assessed as suitable for employment in the sector move into paid employment directly via a work trial, or after a period waiting for the right type of vacancy. Note that paid employment includes apprenticeships.

Transition into employment

Transition into employment

What needs to be done by employment support services during stage 4?

The primary purpose of the route-way is to help unemployed people find sustained employment in social care.

  • It is therefore important that everyone who completes the 60 hour course is given ongoing job search support and continued opportunities for skills development, until they find a job.
  • It is also just as important that this type of support continues to be available throughout the first few weeks in their new job.

Once they start work, the new employer will begin the induction process and they will clearly become the main source of support from this point on. However, the continued involvement of others in the route-way partnership could really help to ease the transition into work.

  • As the type of support that could be made available will vary according to individual circumstances and local resources, we cannot give detailed instructions within this microsite.
  • We do however recommend that employment support services encourage members of the local route-way partnership to be as creative as possible when trying to make sure that transition support is put in place, using whatever resources are available.
  • For example, the route-way course tutors might arrange a follow-up meeting with the learners to re-assess skills needs once in employment, or they might be brought in by the new employer to help with the induction process. Where resources allow, I Care…Ambassadors could adopt an ongoing mentoring role to provide continuity of support at induction and beyond.
Open/Close Stage
Close Stage

Stage 5: Review and evaluation

Review and evaluation feedback on the effectiveness of the route-way from everyone involved in the process. It is important to track learners and check to ensure that all parties are getting what the need from the process.

Review and evaluation

Review and evaluation

It is important to track learners and check to ensure that all parties are getting what the need from the process.

During the preparation phase, those involved in the route-way partnership should discuss the various monitoring systems and evaluation processes that they already have in place so that review and evaluation can take place with the minimum of additional work.

Most colleges and training providers will have systems in place to record initial assessments, learner progress and details of next steps or destinations on completing the course. They will also have systems in place to collect learner satisfaction data.

Most employment support services will have ways of collecting job-search data and employment outcomes but there are sometimes issues over the linking or sharing of data that could limit its usefulness when trying to assess the impact of particular route-way initiatives.

It is therefore important that options are explored and plans for review and evaluation are put in place during the preparation phase before the route-way course itself begins.

Open/Close Stage
Close Stage

Learning providers

Guidance for Learning Providers

Guidance for learning providers

Information for those delivering the pre-employment course.

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Level 1 Award

Level 1 Award

Details of the training course contained within the route-way.

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Further information

Glossary of terms used in this guide

Assessment of learning

A judgement about the extent to which a learner has met the intended learning outcomes of a particular training or development activity.

Think care careers

An interactive online tool produced by Skills for Care that shows the different job roles available within social care at each level, and identifies the range of skills and qualifications that are needed for those roles.

Basic skills assessment

An assessment to identify any skills gaps relating to literacy, numeracy and basic ICT. This should also include an ESOL check (English for speakers of other languages.)

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check

A check that is made with the Disclosure and Barring Service to find out about an individual’s criminal record.

Employability

Employability defines the skills and behaviours required by individuals to, obtain and sustain employment and to progress within the workplace at all levels in the labour market.

Employment advisers

Staff that provide help and advice on jobs and training for unemployed people.

Entry level, level 1 and level 2

These are standardised categories that are used to describe the level of difficulty involved in different qualifications and learning.

I Care…

A series of resources produced by Skills for Care to support employers with their recruitment and retention activity.

I Care…Ambassadors

I Care…Ambassadors are committed and enthusiastic care staff whose aim is to change perceptions about careers in social care. They are trained in presentation skills, given supporting materials and resources, and can talk to different audiences about what it’s really like to work in the social care sector.

Learning outcomes

The things that a learner will be able to do as a result of the training or development they have undertaken.

Level 1 Award in Preparing to Work in Adult Social Care

This is the qualification that participants achieve on successful completion of the route-way course. All pre-employment training for adult social care jobs in England should be based on and lead to the achievement of this Level 1 Award.

Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF)

The Qualifications and Credit framework – the framework for recognising and accrediting qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Sector Route-Way course

This is the 60-hour pre-employment training that all route-way participants undertake. It is designed to give unemployed learners a quick but comprehensive introduction to working in adult social care so that they can decide if a social care career is right for them.

Sector-based work academy for social care

An initiative delivered by Jobcentre Plus for those who are unemployed but considered to be ‘close to the labour market’. They make full use of the route-way and include pre-employment training, work experience and have a guaranteed interview for paid employment.

Sector Route-Way for adult social care

The support process that employment support services can offer to unemployed people, to help them gain the skills and confidence they need to move into jobs in the adult social care sector.

Skills for Care

The workforce development organisation for the adult social care sector in England, and part of the sector skills council, Skills for Care and Development.

Skills Funding Agency

The organisation responsible for ensuring that people and businesses can access the skills training they need.

Unemployed customer

An unemployed person who is being helped into work through support from Jobcentre Plus, the Work Programme or another employment support service.

Work Programme

An initiative where external contracts are being let by the Department of Work and Pensions to help people get back into work. People who have been unemployed for 9 or 12 months and/or those who have specific barriers to employment are referred from Jobcentre Plus. Work Programme providers may use any intervention they wish including the route-way.

Traineeship

An initiative run by local colleges or training providers that provides pre-employment training in English, maths, employability and vocational skills, alongside workplace experience. This initiative is for 16 – 19 year olds but will be extended to people aged up to 24 in due course. It is aimed at those who are not quite ready for employment but are focused on the prospect of work and the intended outcome is that participants will be able to move into employment or start an Apprenticeship within 6 months of engaging in a Traineeship.

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Supporting resources and promotional material

Skills for Care - supporting employment/careers advisors

This leaflet has been developed for staff across employment support services highlighting the vacancies in adult social care and the role of Skills for Care, and introducing the sector route-way.

It also highlights tools where advisers can find out more about the care sector and the career opportunities available. To view this leaflet click here.

Promotional material for potential recruits

Skills for Care’s promotional material on thinking about a career in social care introduces the sector and the benefits of choosing a career in adult social care. It gives an overview of the different job opportunities in the care sector, and includes a self-assessment checklist to help both customers and advisers decide if the care sector is the right choice.

Printed copies can be requested by emailing [email protected]

Think care careers

Skills for Care’s Think care careers e-tool is designed for those interested in finding out more about working in adult social care. The pages use text and video to explain 'what is social care?', 'starting in social care' and 'developing your career'. The interactive online tool shows the different job roles in social care and identifies the range of skills and qualifications needed for those roles.

It can be found at www.skillsforcare.org.uk/careerpathways

I Care...

Skills for Care has developed a series of resources focusing on the perception and image of the social care sector by promoting the different settings, job roles, employers, people who need care and support services, learning and development opportunities and career progression. The I Care... resources, which presently consist of a series of posters, case studies, DVD’s and giveaways, depict real people within the sector, promoting different aspects of that sector.

The resources are free of charge - visit www.skillsforcare.org.uk/icare for further information.

I Care…Ambassadors

I Care…Ambassadors are people who work in adult social care. They deliver talks/presentations/workshops to different audiences about what it’s like to work in the adult social care sector. This could include running a workshop with school children, or attending a careers fair to talk directly with job seekers and others considering a career in care. To find an ambassador visit

A Question of Care: a career for you?

An online quiz for people who are new to social care, they can answer questions which determine if they are suited to a career in care. For this free resource, visit www.aquestionofcare.org.uk

Work experience guides

This guide is for adult social care employers thinking about offering work experience. It will also be of interest to employment/careers advisers who organise pre-employment support programmes for the adult social care sector.

This handbook is designed to help those on the Sector Route-Way get the most out of your their work experience.

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Suitability checklist

Click here to view the suitability checklist.

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Finding care sector specialists

The care sector specialist will provide sector expertise to the potential recruit and the other two route-way partners.

Sector specialists could be drawn from various sources and we expect arrangements to vary from one geographical area to another according to local resources.

In many cases, it is likely that the care sector specialist will be an I Care…Ambassador. I Care…Ambassadors are committed and enthusiastic care staff whose aim is to change perceptions about careers in social care. They do this by being involved in events and activities where they can give positive messages to people of all ages about their own successful and rewarding careers and the career routes available in the sector generally. In other cases, the care sector specialist might be a social care employer or a person who uses social care services. In some cases, the role might be provided by Skills for Care.

How to find care sector specialists in your area

Skills for Care has developed an I Care…Ambassador search register that allows anyone interested in using an I Care…Ambassador to find the right one in their area.

For further information about employer partnerships in your area contact [email protected].

What role will the care sector specialist play in the Sector Route-Way partnership?

Although specific responsibilities will vary according to local resources, the overall purpose of the role is to support the effective delivery of the route-way by providing sector expertise.

Typical duties might include:

  • Promote the care route-way to local employers.
  • Act as a link between local employers and employment support services and encourage self-sustaining links to be developed.
  • Brief employment and careers advisers about job opportunities in the care sector.
  • Help employment support services to promote the care sector at recruitment fairs and large scale redundancy initiatives.
  • Take a lead role in coordinating workplace visits/experience.
  • Support employment advisers when they are checking the suitability of potential recruits.
  • Help to arrange guest speakers for the route-way course.
  • Support tutors with end of course assessment decisions.
  • Monitor progress and help to gather feedback on the effectiveness of the route-way.

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Units to be completed during learning and development

The course component of the route-way has been developed into an accredited award on the Qualification and Credit Framework (QCF). The award consists of five level 1 units and has a credit value of six. Its title is Level 1 Award in Preparing to Work in Adult Social Care.

Learning delivery: The learning outcomes and assessment criteria described within the following units represent the minimum that must be covered during the 60 hour course. Further guidance on delivery of the course, including sample lesson plans, is also provided.

Assessment methods and evidence: Please refer to the relevant awarding organisation for further guidance on the assessment of this award. Visit www.skillsforcare.org.uk/qcf for a list of qualifications developed for adult social care and the awarding organisations offering them.

Title

Introduction to the adult social care sector

Unit ref

PWCS 01

Level

1

Credit value

1

Learning outcomes
The learner will:

Assessment criteria
The learner can:

1. Know about types of social care support available to adults

1.1 Define adult social care
1.2 Outline the different types of adult social care support and their purpose
1.3 Give examples of who would access different types of adult social care support
1.4 Outline how informal care contributes to adult social care

2. Know the range of jobs available in adult social care

2.1 Identify a range of jobs available in adult social care
2.2 Outline settings where adult social care support is provided
2.3 Outline a range of ways to develop a role or career in adult social care

Additional information about the unit

Unit purpose and aim(s)

The aim of this unit is to develop learner’s awareness of the adult social care sector.

Guidance for developing assessment arrangements for the unit (if appropriate)

Adult social care: providing care and/or support for individuals to achieve the quality of life they choose.

Types of adult social care support may include

  • day services
  • residential support including respite
  • domiciliary support
  • community based support
  • support purchased using personal budgets such as personal assistants.

Each of the above may be for older people, or people with mental health illness, dementia, physical disabilities, learning disabilities etc.

Informal care could include support provided by friends, family, neighbours, community groups etc.

Range of jobs should include ancillary roles, managers, trainers in addition to front line staff.

Title

Introduction to the values and principles of adult social care

Unit ref

PWCS 02

Level

1

Credit value

1

Learning outcomes
The learner will:

1. Know the values and principles of adult social care

1.1 Identify key values and principles of adult social care
1.2 Outline why adult social care workers need to promote these values at all times
1.3 Identify areas where own values and principles may conflict with those of adult social care

2. Know the importance of diversity within adult social care

2.1 Outline why it is important to support and respect diversity anddifferent cultures and values2.2 Outline the importance of finding out an individual’s history, needs, wishes, likes and dislikes

Additional information about the unit

Unit purpose and aim(s)

The aim of this unit is to develop learner’s awareness of the values and principles of adult social care.

Guidance for developing assessment arrangements for the unit (if appropriate)

Adult social care: providing care and/or support for individuals to achieve the quality of life they choose. Key values and principles of adult social care include:

  • individuality
  • rights
  • choice
  • privacy
  • independence
  • dignity
  • respect
  • partnership
  • confidentiality.

This list is not exhaustive.

Title

Awareness of the skills and attitudes needed to work in adult social care

Unit ref

PWCS 08

Level

1

Credit value

1

Learning outcomes
The learner will:

Assessment criteria
The learner can:

1. Know the range of skills and attitudes essential to work in adult social care

1.1 List skills and attitudes essential to work in adult social care
1.2 Identify own skills and attitudes essential to work in adult social care
1.3 Identify own skills and attitudes that require further development

Additional information about the unit

Unit purpose and aim(s)

The aim of this unit is to develop learner’s awareness of skills and attitudes needed for working in adult social care.

Guidance for developing assessment arrangements for the unit (if appropriate)

Adult social care: providing care and/or support for individuals to achieve the quality of life they choose. Skills and attitudes essential to work in adult social care include

  • write and speak so that others listen and understand
  • read and understand information shown in a variety of ways including, written and spoken English
  • listen and ask questions to understand other people’s points of view
  • understand the need to be reliable and dependable
  • give examples of a care worker acting responsibly and being accountable in a care work setting
  • understand the purpose of policies and procedures in a social care workplace
  • demonstrate an ability to assess situations and identify problems and suggest solutions in a social care workplace scenario
  • know how to help ‘customers’ and deal with their questions and problems
  • demonstrate willingness to work in a team
  • demonstrate an ability to work well with others
  • be open and respond well to simple changes
  • show interest, initiative and effort
  • understand the need to gain skills and knowledge to support and develop your work
  • be willing to learn from mistakes and accept feedback and offer feedback to others in a positive way
  • be willing to reflect on practice and improve
  • be willing to share skills and to provide feedback to others in a positive way
  • be able to use every day technology such as mobile phones, email applications and basic word processing
  • be able to make estimates and check calculations for accuracy
  • understand how to add, subtract, multiply and divide numbers and give examples of when each should be used in day to day social care work
  • observe and record data accurately and legibly.

Title

Awareness of communication in adult social care

Unit ref

PWCS 09

Level

1

Credit value

2

Learning outcomes
The learner will:

Assessment criteria
The learner can:

1. Know the communication skills needed in adult social care

1.1 Identify the range of communication skills needed in adult social Care

2. Know how adult social care workers can meet the communication and language needs of individuals

2.1 Identify barriers to effective communication
2.2 List ways of overcoming barriers to effective communication

3. Know the importance of record keeping in adult social care settings

3.1 List the different purposes for which record keeping might be used
3.2 Give examples of different types of record keeping used in adult social care settings
3.3 Outline the skills needed to maintain clear, accurate and up to date records

Additional information about the unit

Unit purpose and aim(s)

The aim of this unit is to develop learner’s awareness of communication in adult social care.

Guidance for developing assessment arrangements for the unit (if appropriate)

Adult social care: providing care and/or support for individuals to achieve the quality of life they choose. Communication skills may include:

  • formal
  • informal
  • visual
  • reading
  • writing
  • speaking – verbal / non-verbal
  • listening
  • body language.

Title

Awareness of the role and responsibilities of the adult social care worker

Unit ref

PWCS 10

Level

1

Credit value

2

Learning outcomes
The learner will:

Assessment criteria
The learner can:

1. Know about the responsibilities of the adult social care worker

1.1 Identify main responsibilities of an adult social care worker
1.2 Outline the responsibilities and limits of the relationship between care workers and the individual
1.3 Identify others that adult social care workers may work in partnership with
1.4 Outline the need to report any suspicions about abuse or neglect

2. Know about the role of the adult social care worker

2.1 Identify daily tasks in a range of adult social care roles
2.2 Outline how duty of care might apply to the adult social care worker’s daily role
2.3 Give examples of how to provide person-centred support when supporting individuals in day-to-day activities

Additional information about the unit

Unit purpose and aim(s)

The unit aims to develop learner’s awareness of the role and responsibilities of the adult social care worker.

Guidance for developing assessment arrangements for the unit (if appropriate)

Adult social care: providing care and/or support for individuals to achieve the quality of life they choose. An individual is someone requiring care or support

Others may include:

  • family
  • friends
  • informal carers
  • advocates
  • health professionals such as doctors, dentists, nurses and physiotherapists
  • social workers, housing officers, care assistants
  • organisations providing home services such as cleaning, laundry or meals on wheels
  • community groups and other organisations that the individual has links with.

Duty of care is a legal obligation to:

  • always act in the best interests of individuals and others
  • do not act or fail to act in a way that could cause harm
  • act within your competence and do not take on something you do not believe you can safely do.

Person-centred support ensures that the needs, wishes and preferences of individuals inform their daily care.

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